J-School Centennial Experience

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Opening Ceremony

Posted by Katy Mooney on September 12, 2008

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Let’s Party Like It’s 1967 (and 8)

Posted by Elizabeth Rinehart on September 12, 2008

The excietment was evident in the air last night, Wednesday September the 11th, at the Reynolds Alumni Center for the 1967 and 68 class reunions. As I walked to the reception, I saw old friends reuniting and reminiscing about their college experience.

How was it different back then? Well, for one, according to an atendee, there were only 230 people in class! Sure is different from the thousands we have now… Also, some members of the class of 68 were the firsts to live in co-ed dorm groups (Schurz for women and Hatch for men!) Before this, dorm groups were single-sex (such as Hudson and Gillett for men and Laws and Lathrop for women.) It is through the co-ed dorm ‘areas’ that two members of the class of 68, Neal and Valerie Barry, met. They were set up on a blind date and married in September 1966 and just celebrated their 42nd wedding anniversary and now reside in Alexandria, Virginia!

When I left right before dinner started, I could see the happiness on the faces of the alumni. As the night progressed, I’m sure many happy memories were shared that contributed to this events’ success.

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Missouri Photo Workshop

Posted by Hollyce Cervantes on September 12, 2008

Thursday morning started off a little crazy after my group sighted our first celebrity walking the Mizzou campus, John Anderson from ESPN. After basking in the glory of seeing our idol roaming in our habitat, we quickly ran over to the Missouri Photo Workshop. When we entered the room, there were people packed in rows and sitting on the floors. Many people might have thought that Britney Spears was hosting a seminar because it seems the paparazzi decided to come to the workshop. There were cameras everywhere–in front of me, behind me and to every side. After settling down in the front, I realized I was sitting right next to Kim Komenich in the front row. I was immersed in the action.

Bill Kuykendall started the seminar with a historic and informational slide show on the history of the Photo Workshop. I learned about how much this seminar has grown from a small gathering in Aurora, Missouri to reaching the J-School in Columbia, Missouri. He showed us slides of “Small Town America” pictures that were heartwarming and touching. Kuykendall discussed how these pictures show the fundamental values of Americans and our mythology. These pictures conveyed stories–stories that the photographers wanted to show us. The photographers acted as teachers showing us the importance of these values through pictures. The audience is cooing with oohs and aahs as he flips through the pictures. Everyone in the room was able to connect with the raw essence of human life captured in each photograph.

Next, Kim Komenich stood up to speak to the group. He started off by saying, “There has not been a year where I have not learned something about photography.” Komenich continued by saying that his favorite aspect of photography is the intimacy in photographs. Photographers truly get to live in the world and know the people within it. Then he talked a little bit about Bill Eppridge, who was not present at the seminar. You can view his blog at http://www.billeppridge.com/ . We listened to an audio clip as he reflected on MPW (Missouri Photo Workshop). It is evident how much these great photographers care about pictures as narrative stories. Komenich talked about how Missouri makes the MPW so important. He said, “It’s something about the Midwest. Homecookin’. People have a way of making time for you.” Missouri is the real world and the people make this great state what it is. I glanced at Kim’s notes sitting next to me (being the nosy journalism student that I am) and at the top of his yellow legal pad in doctor’s handwriting is, “Real pictures happen on their time, not yours.” I think that is very relevant to many things in life. However, pictures that truly capture the moment can capture the viewer’s heart. Komenich emphasized that statement multiple times throughout the seminar.

During the question and answer section, my attention was drawn to an older man sitting in the back row. He has been attending MPW since the second one many years ago. His grin fills his entire face. He has lived the “picture perfect” life, recording moments and memories with photographs. He is an inspiration to students, and I had a wonderful time hearing him speak.

Next, a sweet lady in the front row commented on the beginning of MPW. She said, “Show truth with the camera. Early workshops were a bootcamp.” This woman is precious with her light blonde hair and blush pink pants. Her nike shoes are pure as snow white with tiny light baby pink Nike checks. She has the cutest smile plastered on her face. You can tell she is so happy to be a part of this. Her pink cheeks and lips are truly picturesque. She should be in front of the camera instead of behind. Her name is Mimi Smith, and after the seminar, I had the chance of talking to this delightful woman. I will always look up to her.

Overall, even though I am not a photojournalism student, I enjoyed this seminar. Everyone relates to people in pictures because at one point or another, we are those people in the photogrphs. It is a lovely way to capture time and cherish it always. Props to the photo workshop!

More information here!

To contact me, e-mail hmczbd@mizzou.edu.

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What’s Happening at the School in Strategic Communication

Posted by Hannah Jones on September 12, 2008

As a new student to the Missouri School of Journalism, I was ecstatic to learn that I would be able to take part in the Centennial. The Centennial is a great opportunity for all journalism students, and I am very thankful to be able to participate in this wonderful event. The topic of strategic communication instantly caught my eye in class, because strategic communications is the sequence I am currently most interested in. My senior year of high school I was recommended for a Public Service Practicum class, and the class gave me insight into the public relations and advertising industry. Not long after I came to the conclusion that I would enjoy a career in either advertising or public relations. I would love to some day be able to have a career in public relations for a non-profit organization.

Stephen Kopcha, a member of the strategic communication faculty, did a great job of relaying important information to the audience, yet still making the discussion very fun and enjoyable with his added bits of humor. Of course it is always fun to make a stab or two at KU.  Stephan Kopcha began by introducing the Strategic Communications mission; “to be, and to be known as, the best”. A mission I believe to be demanding, but necessary and achievable. He proceeds to show the increase of students entering into the sequence of strategic communication; in 1988 there was a mere 175 students, and in 2008 there is 401 students. Next, the discussion turned to the curriculum and the implement of the Missouri Method. The curriculum, in short, is to develop career-oriented coursework that prepares skilled and ethical communications and create hands on learning opportunities in the tradition of the Missouri Method. Some key phrases mentioned about the curriculum, etc. where:

-“Productive on day one”

-“Real word, for real clients, for real money”

-“Solving business problems with creativity”

Stephen Kopcha also commented on the obligation to meet the needs of an expanding curriculum. Currently, the strategic communications sequence in is need of an endowed chair in international advertising, two endowed professorships, and endowed scholarships to fund international experience for strategic communication students.  The strategic communications research and proposed research were also discussed, such as the Psycho-physiological research on information and media effects (PRIME). 

Stephan Kopcha then turned the mic over to Heather Bashaw, a University of Missouri alumni who graduated this past spring. Heather Bashaw walked the audience through the process of making and Ad in this day and age. It was fascinating for me to learn about the process because I was unaware of the majority of the steps necessary to make an Ad.  I believe the returning alumni found it interesting to see how the industry and the University of Missouri Journalism School has changed. Some steps in the process of making an Ad include, the necessity to know EVERYTHING about the product, goal, target audience, creative brief, finding a higher order benefit, photoshop, etc. Heather Bashaw also did a great job of adding humor into her lecture and making it enjoyable to listen to.

Lastly, Larry Powel, Director of Mojo Ad/Creative director, and University of Missouri Journalism students informed the audience about Mojo Ad, which stands for Missouri Journalism. In 2005 Mojo Ad was created. Mojo Ad specializes in YAYA, which stands for youths and young adults (people between the ages of 18-25). Mojo Ad is a University of Missouri student run Ad agency. The students shared some of their previous experience over the past coupe of years working with Halmark and Long John Silvers. Unfortunately, only about 40 students are able to participate in Mojo Ad. Mojo Ad is very competition driven, just like the advertising industry, and offers a wide variety of positions for students. For more information about MOJO you can visit http://www.Mojo-Ad.com. 

It is hard to believe that it is only the third week of my first semester as a University of Missouri Journalism Student. I have already gained an immense amount of knowledge and experience in just a couple of days, and I cannot wait for the 4 years that lay ahead. I would also like to say thank you to everyone who made this event possible. I really appreciate the opportunity you provided for me and the other journalism students. 

Story written by Hannah Jones

 

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